Honda Prelude (2000 year). Manual - part 2

 

  Index      Honda     Honda Prelude - service manual 2000 year in english

 

Search            copyright infringement  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Content   ..   1  2  3   ..

 

 

Honda Prelude (2000 year). Manual - part 2

 

 

Protecting Adults

3.  Adjust the Seat-Backs

Adjust the driver's seat-back to a

comfortable, upright position,
leaving ample space between your
chest and the airbag cover in the
center of the steering wheel. If you
sit too close to the steering wheel,
you could be injured if the airbag
inflates.

A front passenger should also adjust

the seat-back to an upright position,
but as far from the dashboard as
possible. A passenger who sits too
close to the dashboard could be
injured if the airbag inflates.

Reclining a seat-back so that the
shoulder part of the belt no longer
rests against the occupant's chest
reduces the protective capability of
the belt. It also increases the chance
of sliding under the belt in a crash
and being seriously injured. The

farther a seat-back is reclined, the
greater the risk of injury.

See page 

80

 for how to adjust seat-

backs.

Driver and  Passenger Safety

Reclining the seat-back too far

can result in serious injury or
death in a crash.

Adjust the seat-back to an

upright position and sit well
back in the seat.

03/07/10 16:11:09 31S5A930 0021 

03/07/10 16:11:09 31S5A930 0021 

Main Menu

Table of Contents

Protecting Adults

4.  Adjust the Head Restraints

Before driving, make sure everyone
with an adjustable head restraint has
properly positioned the head
restraint. The restraint should be
positioned so the back of the
occupant's head rests against the
center of the restraint. A taller
person should adjust the restraint as
high as possible.

Properly adjusted head restraints
will help protect occupants from
whiplash and other crash injuries.

See page 

82

 for how to adjust the

head restraints.

Driver  and  Passenger  Safety

Improperly positioning head
restraints reduces their

effectiveness and you can be
seriously injured in a crash.

Make sure head restraints are
in place and positioned properly
before driving.

03/07/10 16:11:09 31S5A930 0021 

03/07/10 16:11:09 31S5A930 0021 

Main Menu

Table of Contents

Protecting Adults

5.  Fasten and Position the Seat

Belts

Insert the latch plate into the buckle,
then tug on the belt to make sure the
belt is securely latched. Also check
that the belt is not twisted, because a
twisted belt can cause serious
injuries in a crash.

Position the lap part of the belt as
low as possible across your hips,
then pull up on the shoulder part of
the belt so the lap part fits snugly.

This lets your strong pelvic bones

take the force of a crash and reduces
the chance of internal injuries.

If necessary, pull up on the belt again

to remove any slack from the
shoulder part, then check that the
belt rests across the center of your
chest and over your shoulder. This

spreads the forces of a crash over
the strongest bones in your upper

body.

Never place the shoulder portion of a
lap/shoulder belt under your arm or

behind your back. This could cause

very serious injuries in a crash.

Driver and  Passenger Safety

Improperly positioning the seat

belts can cause serious injury
or death in a crash.

Make sure all seat belts are
properly positioned before

driving.

03/07/10 16:11:09 31S5A930 0021 

03/07/10 16:11:09 31S5A930 0021 

Main Menu

Table of Contents

Protecting Adults

If a seat belt does not seem to work
as it should, it may not protect the
occupant in a crash. No one should

sit in a seat with an inoperative seat
belt.
 Anyone using a seat belt that is

not working properly can be
seriously injured or killed. Have your
Honda dealer check the belt as soon
as possible.

See page 

42

 for additional

information about your seat belt
system and how to take care of your
belts.

6.  Adjust the Steering Wheel

Adjust the steering wheel, if needed,

so that the wheel points toward your
chest, not toward your face.

Pointing the steering wheel toward

your chest provides optimal

protection from the airbag.

See page 

66

 for how to adjust the

steering wheel.

Driver and  Passenger Safety

Main Menu

Table of Contents

Protecting Adults

7.  Maintain a Proper Sitting

Position

After all occupants have adjusted

their seats and put on seat belts, it is
very important that they continue to
sit upright, well back in their seats,
with their feet on the floor, until the
car is parked and the engine is off.

Sitting improperly can increase the
chance of injury during a crash. For
example, if an occupant slouches,
lies down, turns sideways, sits
forward, leans forward or sideways,
or puts one or both feet up, the
chance of injury during a crash is
greatly increased.

In addition, an occupant who is out of
position in the front seat can be
seriously or fatally injured by
striking interior parts of the car, or
by being struck by an inflating airbag.

Remember, to get the best
protection from your car's airbags
and other safety features, you must
sit properly and wear your seat belt
properly.

Driver and Passenger Safety

Sitting improperly or out of
position can result in serious

injury or death in a crash.

Always sit upright, well back in
the seat, with your feet on the
floor.

03/07/10 16:11:09 31S5A930 0021 

03/07/10 16:11:09 31S5A930 0021 

Main Menu

Table of Contents

Protecting Adults

Advice for Pregnant Women

Because protecting the mother is the

best way to protect her unborn child,
a pregnant woman should always

wear a seat belt whenever she drives

or rides in a vehicle.

Remember to keep the lap portion of
the belt as low as possible across

your hips.

Pregnant women should also sit
upright and as far back as possible
from the steering wheel or
dashboard. This will reduce the risk
of injuries to both the mother and
her unborn child that can be caused
by a crash or an inflating airbag.

Each time you have a check-up, ask

your doctor if it's okay for you to

drive.

Additional Safety Precautions

Two people should never use the
same seat belt.
 If they do, they

could be very seriously injured in a
crash.

Do not put any accessories on seat

belts. Devices intended to improve

occupant comfort or reposition the
shoulder part of a seat belt can
severely compromise the
protective capability of the seat
belt and increase the chance of
serious injury in a crash.

CONTINUED

Driver and  Passenger Safety

Main Menu

Table of Contents

Protecting Adults

Do not place hard or sharp objects

between yourself and an airbag.

Carrying hard or sharp objects on

your lap, or driving with a pipe or

other sharp object in your mouth,
can result in injuries if your
airbags inflate.

Do not attach or place objects on

the front airbag covers. Any object

attached to or placed on the covers
marked "SRS AIRBAG" in the
center of the steering wheel and
on top of the dashboard could
interfere with the proper operation
of the airbags. Or, if the airbags
inflate, the objects could be
propelled inside the car and hurt
someone.

Keep your hands and arms away
from the airbag covers.
 If your

hands or arms are close to the
airbag covers in the center of the

steering wheel and on top of the
dashboard, they could be injured if

the airbags inflate.

Driver and  Passenger Safety

Main Menu

Table of Contents

Protecting Children

Children depend on adults to protect
them. However, despite their best
intentions, many parents and other
adults may not know how to properly
protect young passengers.

So if you have children, or if you ever
need to drive with a grandchild or
other children in your car, be sure to
read this section.

All  Children Must  Be Restrained

Each year, many children are injured
or killed in vehicle crashes because
they are either unrestrained or not
properly restrained. In fact, vehicle
accidents are the number one cause
of death of children ages 12 and
under.

To reduce the number of child

deaths and injuries, every state and
Canadian province requires that
infants and children be restrained

whenever they ride in a vehicle.

Any child who is too small to wear a

seat belt should be properly

restrained in a child seat. (See page

25

.)

A larger child should always be

restrained with a seat belt. (See page

37

.)

Driver  and  Passenger  Safety

Children who are unrestrained
or improperly restrained can be
seriously injured or killed in a
crash.

Any child too small for a seat

belt should be properly
restrained in a child seat. A
larger child should be properly
restrained with a seat belt.

03/07/10 16:11:09 31S5A930 0021 

03/07/10 16:11:09 31S5A930 0021 

Main Menu

Table of Contents

Protecting Children

Children Should Sit in the Back

Seat

According to accident statistics,

children of all ages and sizes are
safer when they are restrained in the
back seat, not the front seat. The
National Highway Traffic Safety

Administration and Transport

Canada recommend that all children
ages 12 and under be properly

restrained in the back seat.
In the back seat, children are less
likely to be injured by striking hard
interior parts during a collision or
hard braking. Also, children cannot
be injured by an inflating airbag

when they ride in the back.

The Passenger's Airbag Poses

Serious Risks to Children

Airbags have been designed to help

protect adults in a moderate to
severe frontal collision. To do this,
the passenger's airbag is quite large,
and it inflates with tremendous

speed.

Infants
Never put a rear-facing child seat in

the front seat of a vehicle equipped
with a passenger's airbag.
 If the

airbag inflates, it can hit the back of
the child seat with enough force to
kill or very seriously injure an infant.

Small Children

Placing a forward-facing child seat in

the front seat of a vehicle equipped
with a passenger's airbag can be

hazardous. If the vehicle seat is too
far forward, or the child's head is
thrown forward during a collision, an
inflating airbag can strike the child
with enough force to kill or very
seriously injure a small child.

Larger Children

Children who have outgrown child
seats are also at risk of being injured
or killed by an inflating passenger's

airbag. Whenever possible, larger

children should sit in the back seat,
properly restrained with a seat belt.

(See page 

37

 for important

information about protecting larger
children.)

Driver and Passenger Safety

Main Menu

Table of Contents

Protecting Children

U.S. Models

To remind you of the passenger's

airbag hazards, and that children
must be properly restrained in the
back seat, your car has warning
labels on the dashboard and on the
driver's and front passenger's visors.
Please read and follow the
instructions on these labels.

Canadian Models

To remind you of the airbag hazards,

your car has warning labels on the

driver's and front passenger's visors.
Please read and follow the
instructions on these labels.

Driver and  Passenger Safety

Main Menu

Table of Contents

Protecting Children

If You Must Drive with Several

Children

Your car has two seating positions in
the back seat where children can be
properly restrained.

If you ever have to carry more than
two children in your car:

Place the largest child in the front
seat, provided the child is large
enough to wear a seat belt
properly (see page 

37

).

Move the vehicle seat as far to the
rear as possible (see page 

13

).

Have the child sit upright and well
back in the seat (see page 

19

).

Make sure the seat belt is properly
positioned and secured (see page

17

).

If a Child Requires  Close

Attention

Many parents say they prefer to put
an infant or small child in the front
passenger seat so they can watch the
child, or because the child requires
attention.

Placing a child in the front seat
exposes the child to hazards from
the airbag, and paying close
attention to a child distracts the
driver from the important tasks of
driving, placing both of you at risk.

If a child requires physical attention
or frequent visual contact, we
strongly recommend that another
adult ride with the child in the back
seat. The back seat is far safer for a
child than the front.

Additional Safety Precaution

Do not leave children alone in your
vehicle.
 Leaving children without

adult supervision is illegal in most
states and Canadian provinces, and
can be very hazardous. For example,
infants and small children left in a
vehicle on a hot day can die from
heatstroke. And children left alone
with the key in the ignition can
accidentally set the vehicle in motion,
possibly injuring themselves or
others.

Driver and Passenger Safety

Main Menu

Table of Contents

Protecting Children

General Guidelines for Using

Child Seats

The following pages give general
guidelines for selecting and installing

child seats for infants and small
children.

Selecting a Child Seat

To provide proper protection, a child

seat should meet three
requirements:

1. The child seat should meet

safety standards. The child seat

should meet Federal Motor

Vehicle Safety Standard 213

(FMVSS 213) or Canadian

Motor Vehicle Safety Standard
213 (CMVSS 213). Look for the
manufacturer's statement of

compliance on the box and seat.

2. The child seat should be of the

proper type and size to fit the

child.

Infants: Children up to about one

year old should be restrained in a
rear-facing, reclining child seat. Only
a rear-facing seat provides the
proper support to protect an infant's
head, neck, and back. See page

29

 for additional information on

protecting infants.

Small Children: A child who is too

large for a rear-facing child seat, and

who can sit up without support,

should be restrained in a forward-
facing child seat. See page

 36

 for

additional information on protecting
small children.

CONTINUED

Driver and  Passenger Safety

Main Menu

Table of Contents

Protecting Children

3. The child seat should fit the

vehicle seating position (or

positions) where it will be used.

Due to variations in the design of
child seats, vehicle seats, and seat
belts, all child seats will not fit all
vehicle seating positions.

However, Honda is confident that
one or more child seat models can fit
and be properly installed in all
recommended seating positions in

your car.

Before purchasing a child seat, we
recommend that parents test the
child seat in the specific vehicle
seating position (or positions) where
they intend to use the seat. If a
previously purchased child seat does
not fit, you may need to buy a
different one that will fit.

Driver and Passenger Safety

Main Menu

Table of Contents

Protecting Children

Placing a Child Seat

This page briefly summarizes

Honda's recommendations on where
to place rear-facing and forward-
facing child seats in your car.

Front Passenger's Seat
Infants:
 Never in the front seat, clue

to the passenger's airbag hazard.

Small children: Not recommended,

due to the passenger's airbag
hazard. If a small child must ride
in front, move the vehicle seat to
the rear-most position and secure
a front-facing child seat with the
seat belt (see page 

34

).

Back Seats

Infants: Recommended positions.

Secure a rear-facing child seat

with the seat belt (see page 

30

 ).

Small children: Recommended

positions. Secure a front-facing
child seat with the seat belt (see
page 

34

 ).

Driver and Passenger Safety

Airbags Pose Serious

Risks to Children

The passenger's airbag inflates
with enough force to kill or

seriously injure an infant in a

rear-facing child seat.

A small child in a forward-facing

child seat is also at risk. If the

vehicle seat is too far forward,

or the child's head is thrown

forward during a collision, an
inflating airbag can kill or
seriously injure the child.

If a small child must ride in the
front, follow the instructions
provided in this section.

CONTINUED

Main Menu

Table of Contents

Protecting Children

Installing a Child Seat

After selecting a proper child seat,

and a good position to install the seat,
there are three main steps in
installing the seat:

1. Secure the child seat to the car

with a seat belt. All child seats

must be secured to the car with
the lap part of a lap/shoulder belt.

A child whose seat is not properly

secured to the car can be
endangered in a crash. See pages

30

 and 

34 

for instructions on how

to secure child seats in this car.

2. Make sure the child seat is firmly

secured. After installing a child

seat, push and pull the seat

forward and from side to side to
verify that it is secure.

To provide security during normal

driving maneuvers as well as during
a collision, we recommend that

parents secure a child seat as firmly
as possible.

However, a child seat does not need
to be "rock solid." In some vehicles
or seating positions, it may be
difficult to install a child seat so that
it does not move at all. Some side-to-
side or back-and-forth movement can

be expected and should not reduce
the child seat's effectiveness.

If the child seat is not secure, try
installing it in a different seating
position, or use a different style of
child seat that can be firmly secured
in the desired seating position.

3. Secure the child in the child seat.

Make sure the child is properly
strapped in the child seat
according to the child seat maker's
instructions. A child who is not
properly secured in a child seat
can be thrown out of the seat in a
crash and seriously injured.

Storing a Child Seat

When you are not using a child seat,

either remove it and store it in a safe
place, or make sure it is properly
secured. An unsecured child seat can
be thrown around the car during a
crash or sudden stop and injure
someone.

Driver  and  Passenger  Safety

Main Menu

Table of Contents

Protecting Children

Protecting Infants

Child Seat Type

Only a rear-facing child seat provides
proper support for a baby's head,
neck, and back. Infants up to about
one year of age must be restrained in
a rear-facing child seat.

Two types of seats may be used: a

seat designed exclusively for infants,
or a convertible seat used in the rear-

facing, reclining mode.

We recommend that an infant be
restrained in a rear-facing child seat
until the infant reaches the seat
maker's weight or height limit and is
able to sit up without support.

Rear-Facing Child Seat Placement

In this car, a rear-facing child seat
can be placed in any seating position
in the back seat, but not in the front
seat.

Never put a rear-facing child seat in

the front seat. If the passenger's

airbag inflates, it can hit the back of
the child seat with enough force to
kill or seriously injure an infant. If an
infant must be closely watched, we
recommend that another adult sit in
the back seat with the baby.

Do not put a rear-facing child seat in
a forward-facing position.
 If placed

facing forward, an infant could be
very seriously injured during a
frontal collision.

Driver and Passenger Safety

CONTINUED

Placing a rear-facing child seat
in the front seat can result in

serious injury or death if the
airbags inflate.

Always place a rear-facing child
seat in the back seat, not the
front.

03/07/10 16:11:09 31S5A930 0021 

03/07/10 16:11:09 31S5A930 0021 

Main Menu

Table of Contents

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Content   ..   1  2  3   ..